EAI

EAI is short for “Enterprise Application Integration“, a methodology which balances seamless experience across heterogeneous enterprise applications and datasets of various origins, scope and capability with the need to make major changes to those applications or datasets.

 

ECBS

The European Committee for Banking Standards (“ECBS”) was a standards body that focused on European banking technology and infrastructure.  It was formed in 1992 and disbanded in 2006; it has since been replaced by the European Payments Council.

It is still common to see references to the ECBS in GSIT and PeSIT documentation.

Enterprise Application Integration

Enterprise Application Integration (“EAI”) is a methodology which balances seamless experience across heterogeneous enterprise applications and datasets of various origins, scope and capability with the need to make major changes to those applications or datasets.

Today, EAI often uses ESB (“Enterprise Service Bus”) infrastructure to allow these various applications to communicate with each other.  Before ESB, MOM (“Message-Oriented Middleware”) would have been used instead.

Today’s convergence of file transfer and EAI systems was foretold by Steve Cragg’s 2003 white paper entitled “File Transfer for the Future – Using modern file transfer solutions as part of an EAI strategy”.   In that paper, Cragg wrote that, “judicious use of file transfer in its modern form as part of an overall EAI strategy can reduce overall business risk, deliver an attractive level of ROI, speed time to market for new services and enable new business opportunities quickly (for example B2B).”

 

Enterprise Service Bus

An Enterprise Service Bus (“ESB”) is a modern integration concept that refers to architectural patterns or specific technologies designed to rapidly interconnect heterogeneous applications across different operating systems, platforms and deployment models.

ESBs include a set of capabilities that speed and standardize a Service-Oriented Architecture (“SOA”), including service creation and mediation, routing, data transformation, and management of messages between endpoints.

With the rise of SOA in the mid-2000′s, ESBs took over from MOM (“Message-Oriented Middleware”) as the leading technology behind EAI (“Enterprise Application Integration”).

Examples of commonly deployed ESBs include MuleSoft’s open source Mule ESB, IBM WebSphere ESB, Red Hat JBoss and Oracle ESB.  The Java Business Integration project (“JBI”) from Apache is also often referred to as an ESB.

ESB

ESB is short for “Enterprise Service Bus“, a modern integration technology used to quickly tie heterogeneous applications across different operating systems, platforms and deployment models.

 

European Payments Council

The European Payments Council (“EPC”) coordinates European inter-banking technology and protocols, particularly in relation to payments.  In 2011 the EPC boasted that it processed 71.5 billion electronic payment transactions.

The EPC assumed all the former duties of the European Committee for Banking Standards (“ECBS”) in 2006.  It is now the major driver behind the Single Euro Payments Area (SEPA) initiative.

The official site of the EPC is http://www.europeanpaymentscouncil.eu/

External Authentication

External authentication is the use of third-party authentication sources to decide whether a user should be allowed access to a system, and often what level of access an authenticated user enjoys on a system.

In file transfer, external authentication frequently refers to the use of Active Directory (AD), LDAP or RADIUS servers, and also refer to the use of various single sign on (SSO) technologies.

External authentication sources typically provide username information and password authentication.  Other types of authentication available include client certificates (particularly with AD or LDAP servers), PINs from hardware tokens (common with RADIUS servers) or soft/browser tokens (common with SSO technology).

External authentication sources often provide file transfer servers with the full name, email address and other contact information related to an authenticating user.  They can also provide group membership, home folder, address book and access privileges.  When external authentication technology involves particularly rich user or partner profiles and allows users and partners to maintain their own information, then the external authentication technology used to onboard users and partners is often called “Community Management” technology.

See also “provisioning” and “deprovisioning“.

   
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